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Einstein's gravitational waves detected by scientists

A bird's eye view of Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) Hanford laboratory's laser and vacuum equipment area (LVEA) which houses the pre-stabilized laser, beam splitter, input test masses, and other equipment near Hanford, Washington is shown in this June 26, 2014 photo released by Caltech/MIT/LIGO Laboratory on February 8, 2016.
The collision of two black holes holes - a tremendously powerful event detected for the first time ever by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO - is seen in this still image from a computer simulation released in Washington. Scientists have for the first time detected gravitational waves, ripples in space and time hypothesized by Albert Einstein a century ago, in a landmark discovery announced on Thursday that opens a new window for studying the cosmos. 
Dr. David Reitze, Executive Director of the LIGO Laboratory at Caltech, speaks about gravitational waves, ripples in space and time hypothesized by physicist Albert Einstein a century ago, in Washington February 11, 2016. The waves were detected by twin Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave detectors (LIGO) in Louisiana and Washington states in September 2015.

Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) technicians perform a Large optic inspection in this undated photo released by Caltech/MIT/LIGO Laboratory on February 8, 2016. The twin detectors, a system of two identical detectors constructed to detect incredibly tiny vibrations from passing gravitational waves, are located in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington.
A Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) technician installs a mode cleaner tube baffle used to control stray light as a part of the Advanced LIGO auxiliary optics system in this December 24, 2010 photo released by Caltech/MIT/LIGO Laboratory on February 8, 2016. Scientists said they have for the first time detected gravitational waves, ripples in space and time hypothesized by physicist Albert Einstein a century ago, in a landmark discovery that opens a new window for studying the cosmos. 
An artist's illustration shows a supermassive black hole with millions to billions times the mass of our sun at the center, surrounded by matter flowing onto the black hole in what is termed an accretion disk in this NASA illustration released on February 27, 2013. Supermassive black holes are enormously dense objects buried at the hearts of galaxies. This disk forms as the dust and gas in the galaxy falls onto the hole, attracted by its gravity.
Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) technicians working at LIGO Livingston Observatory near Livington, Louisiana in this undated photo released by Caltech/MIT/LIGO Laboratory on February 8, 2016. 
An aerial photo shows Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) Livingston Laboratory detector site near Livingston, Louisiana in this undated photo released by Caltech/MIT/LIGO Laboratory on February 8, 2016.
A bird's eye view of Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) Hanford laboratory's laser and vacuum equipment area (LVEA) which houses the pre-stabilized laser, beam splitter, input test masses, and other equipment near Hanford, Washington is shown in this June 26, 2014 photo released by Caltech/MIT/LIGO Laboratory on February 8, 2016. 
One of Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) test masses installed as the 4th element in a 4-element suspension system is shown in this September 5, 2013 photo released by Caltech/MIT/LIGO Laboratory on February 8, 2016. "Test masses" are what LIGO scientists call the mirrors that reflect the laser beams along the lengths of the detector arms. The 40 kg test mass is suspended below the metal mass above by 4 silica glass fibers.



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